in support of KyoAni



  • Hi
    Im guessing we have all heard of the tragic events that happened at KyoAni, and want to support the studio any way we can.
    even though i would love to see the studio restored i do not think its enough to just rebuild. Art and artist of the caliber found at Kyoto Animation should be as well known as Disney or Ghibli.

    now this is a long shot, but i was hoping as a way of boosting the fanbase and supporting the studio, if j-novel club could translate kyo's Light Novels in to English.

    thanks
    big bad bob


  • Premium Member

    What company publishes their novels? You can see a list of license suggestions here:

    https://forums.j-novel.club/topic/1156/read-first-compiled-list-of-existing-suggestion-topics

    You can click on links to go to specific books and vote for them (up-vote the first post in the topic)

    JNC is a small company and a business that needs to pay its staff and the license-holders, so they probably aren't going to license titles that they will lose money on out of sympathy.


  • Premium Member

    rightstufanime.com has a KyoAni contribution page, or at least had one for several months.


  • Premium Member

    Also keep in mind that licensing a KyoAni novel, regardless of which US company does it, will result in more work for KyoAni, in the form of contract negotiations, sending materials, approving final products, arranging royalty payments, and more.

    Licensing is ultimately a business transaction, not an act of "kindness". In the end, it's up to KyoAni to decide if or when they want to license any of their properties.



  • @stardf29 true it's just a shame to see great art lost


  • Premium Member

    @stardf29 But giving a business work to do is, ultimately, the way to "heal" that business. Charity can bridge the gap, and help the families directly affected, but without work to do and revenue from that work, the company will ultimately fail.

    @bob-bob-bob-bob The amount of people and assets (art) lost shows that too much stuff was on-premise. Pretty much everyone and every thing seems to have been in the one building. That has its conveniences, but it also has its risks. A fire that didn't kill anyone still could destroy the company.



  • @someoldguy well said, kyo will never be the same again and they will need space, but we can't just let them slip away


  • Premium Member

    @someoldguy said in in support of KyoAni:

    @stardf29 But giving a business work to do is, ultimately, the way to "heal" that business. Charity can bridge the gap, and help the families directly affected, but without work to do and revenue from that work, the company will ultimately fail.

    You're not wrong, but doing work requires resources, which the company might rather use elsewhere. Especially given that KyoAni is primarily an animation company, they might want to focus what resources they have on animation-related stuff rather than on light novel licensing. And especially considering that they haven't licensed anything out in English at all yet, setting everything up for all that might require too many resources that they can't really afford at the moment, to say nothing of whether the gains from doing such would be worth it.

    It's a nice sentiment, but "I want to support KyoAni by giving them more work to do" is a bit of a double-edged sword; at the very least, it's something that is ultimately KyoAni's decision, regardless of what our own desires for them are.



  • @stardf29 no harm in asking


  • Member

    @bob-bob-bob-bob Sam has said several times that he can barely get in the KyoAni novels building to set up an appointment before he got kicked out. They are that uninterested in licensing, probably to any language.



  • @legitpancake i don't know all the ins and outs of this, but it seems unusual for a business to turn down a possibility of profit



  • @bob-bob-bob-bob Kyoani is not the only company that refuses to license any series to outside companies (not just JNC).

    Whatever their reasons are they chose not to focus on international distribution and to them that seems to be working.



  • "strange" there are alot of things i don't understand. all the arguments i can think for this would also apply to the anime???? and it is working for them so what do I know


  • Member

    @bob-bob-bob-bob

    According to the Wikipedia article on their book publishing business, they have pretty odd form of distribution which is not along the main stream Japanese publication at all. It is very limited to direct online store or via animation related online store, and small number of book stores. You cannot even buy them on Amazon in Japan. So, obviously it is not a big part of their business.



  • @hiroto a real head scratcher, and a substantial lost to worlds book stores and art


  • Premium Member

    @bob-bob-bob-bob said in in support of KyoAni:

    @legitpancake i don't know all the ins and outs of this, but it seems unusual for a business to turn down a possibility of profit

    It's not unusual at all. As you said, it's a possibility of profit; there's likewise a possibility they would just lose money in the end, which for a company in KyoAni's state would be very dangerous. Of course, business is all about taking risks, but again, KyoAni is first and foremost an animation company; they might not want to take big risks in side areas like light novels.

    And even if somehow, profit could be guaranteed from licensing, there's also the question of whether or not the resources that would be required for licensing could be put elsewhere to gain more profit (again, KyoAni primarily being an animation company plays into this). There are other factors beyond raw profit margins that go into business decisions, too, which makes it hard to say for sure why any company does what they do. All we outsiders can really do is make our requests and not get too salty when they get ignored for reasons we might or might not know.