A spoiler question about If it's for my daughter... (up to book 7)


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    Edit: Sorry, you can't add the poll to the spoiler section FeelsBadMan.
    Edit 2: My vote and the reason for it is in the spoiler.

    I've even added the poll to the spoiler section since if you haven't started the series yet it will be a spoiler. Please don't' discuss anything that happens after about 1/2 way through book 7.


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    After she had her feelings for him, that was it. Author made his mind in that moment. You dont that kind a thing if you wont be commitment about that kind a thing from the start. I start reading the books with one go, so i dont remember that volume. However if that first feeling came around 2-3 volume, i would say "yes" it was a sure thing from the beginning.


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    @hopebestman I listed my reasons for why I'm not sure in the spoiler, which I forgot to mention. The whole main story only goes until about volume 6.5. She confesses her love for him at the end of volume 3, and it was only really directly brought up that she wants more earlier in that volume. That means that about 1/2 of the main story it is set up like it is going to be father/daughter and then 1/2 it turns into lovers. With the reasons I listed above, that kind of makes me believe that somewhere around writing the 3rd volume the author decided they wanted to turn it from parent/child to romantic.


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    @db0ssman i honestly never thought about when author thought their relationship. I after Dale start having feelings for her, book because problem for me. I really dont like that kind a story or relationship. For Latina's view, i can understand totally. Dale saved her, protect her and he was there when she needed him. So he was her "prince charming" from the beginning. However, that dude adopted her. Told everyone "she is my daughter and bla bla bla" but after that changed, i just finished the book quickly as much as possible then burried in my deppest memories.


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    @hopebestman Lol. I can definitely understand that. I think with the way they did it, it wasn't as creepy as I thought it would be when I first found out it bent that way (but I had already started). Explain to someone that it is a story about a man that finds a 7-yo girl who he gets engaged to at 14, beds at 16, and marries years later and try not to get a dirty look.


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    I think the author totally planned this from the start, and just tried to make the transition of their relationship as smooth as possible (as in, there was enough build-up). The relationship only started changing since volume 3, which is when Latina started hitting puberty, IMHO is as smooth and graceful as possible (and at that point, I think there is nothing much creepy or anything, especially in hindsight).
    About the gender of the golden king, I think that's one of the convenient thing of the Japanese language. It's used as a tool by author all the time. And about the flashbacks, this series is pretty much a slice-of-life. Maybe the author deliberately chose this genre for convenience.


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    @tgquan67

    Like I said before I put no, but not sure because it is possible that the author just likes to be subversive in their writing even if it means purposely misleading the reader (like with the golden king). There is a possibility that the author thought this way from the start and was like 'I'll make her seven (but look 5), and be kind of misleading about Dale's age and life when they meet so that no one will suspect they get married later. I just think Occam's Razor would say it's more likely part-way through writing he decided a romance would be better than a father/daughter story. IMO at least, that much better explains the sloppiness of the timeline and why most things that would normally be used as foreshadowing come after the fact instead.


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    @tgquan67 said in A spoiler question about If it's for my daughter... (up to book 7):

    Maybe the author deliberately chose this genre for convenience.

    I think this genre is the only way this story could be told without it being too creepy.
    Dale and Latina are from vastly different cultures, have different lifespans. To fall in love with someone you raise (or who raised you) ...It's still a bit off putting if I stop to think about it, but while reading I almost didn't notice (I hope that isn't a poor reflection on my personality)

    spoiler below is a spoiler for after book 7 so if you're not there yet don't look

    I also think that there is something, possibly unique to Japanese culture, where "I want to marry my daddy" is considered cute and not as much of cringe/squick fuel as it is in some other cultures- not actual incest, just a trope that is played with (protective dads beating the crap out of anyone why tries to look to much at 'their' little girl, girls fawning over their dad or older brother - usually this ends when the girls hit puberty and decide that dad is 'gross' and can't have laundry in the same machine load, and dad is crushed as he is no longer the apple of her eye...


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    @Jon-Mitchell said in A spoiler question about If it's for my daughter... (up to book 7):

    I also think that there is something, possibly unique to Japanese culture, where "I want to marry my daddy" is considered cute and not as much of cringe/squick fuel as it is in some other cultures- not actual incest, just a trope that is played with (protective dads beating the crap out of anyone why tries to look to much at 'their' little girl, girls fawning over their dad or older brother - usually this ends when the girls hit puberty and decide that dad is 'gross' and can't have laundry in the same machine load, and dad is crushed as he is no longer the apple of her eye...

    I think it might have something to do with the Tale of Hikaru Genji, one of Japan's earlier novels. On one occasion, the protagonist tries to groom a young girl to later be his bride. You're right in how it's referenced several times in pop culture.


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    I like to think that the series is written around the idea of fate and the red string of it.

    Only a hero can defeat the Demon Lord, but does it have to be by force? What if the Demon lord and the hero fall in love and with it balance?
    In some ways the series and the romance is how you take it. When you look at the 2, both Dale and Lalatina are well isolated.
    Dale is effectively a societal outcast despite his connections and strength. He is alone and it is his meeting, by chance, by fate which restores him and makes him a true fairy tail hero.
    For Lalatina, she is the forsaken child, destined for doom, having lost all that she holds dear at a young age, destined to be reviled by her own kind because if who she will become but also of the stigma of the broken horn. But in her moment of vulnerability, in her moment of near death she finds Dale. A man who would love her unconditionally and surrender everything for her, including his humanity.

    To me, that is how I read the series, and why I believe it was a planned romance.


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    IDK, it could be a mix of things, I guess. Like maybe since this is written for a Japanese audience that taking an American viewpoint to it means that I found a lot of things that look like it should disqualify it as a romance (or at least like it is purposely not going there), but in Japanese culture, it wouldn't. Like a 7 YO and a 20 something isn't a strange couple or that a father/daughter isn't an unexpected pairing... that just seems weird to say.

    Though in American culture, a child having a crush on a parent is not that unusual in little kids, but it is just treated as a cute phase, not a call to action.


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